Public Safety

  • May 22, 2015 • Public Safety

    Raleigh, N.C. - Memorial Day weekend is North Carolina’s unofficial kickoff to summer, but it also marks the beginning of hurricane season. Governor Pat McCrory has declared May 24-30, 2015 as Hurricane Preparedness Week and is encouraging residents to update their emergency plans and supply kits. Hurricane season officially begins June 1 and runs through November. 

     

    “It’s never too early to prepare for hurricanes and severe storms,” Governor McCrory said. “We have already had our first storm of the season when Tropical Storm Ana moved through in early May and last year Hurricane Arthur made landfall in our state July 3rd.”

     

    McCrory said both storms served as timely reminders that it is important to prepare early. He urged families to discuss their emergency plans and assemble or update their supply kits. These simple steps can help you recover much quicker after a storm, he said. 

     

    Emergency kits should contain enough non-perishable food and a gallon of water per person per day to last three to seven days. Other essential items include: 

     

    • Copies of insurance papers and identification sealed in a watertight plastic bag 
    • First-aid kit 
    • Weather radio and batteries
    • Supply of prescription medicines 
    • Sleeping bag or blankets
    • Changes of clothes 
    • Hygiene items such as toothbrush, toothpaste, soap and deodorant 
    • Cash or checkbook 
    • Pet supplies including food, water, leashes, bedding, muzzle and vaccination records

     

    Residents are also encouraged to review and update their homeowners' or renters' insurance policies now to make sure they include coverage for accidental damage, natural disasters and, if necessary, flood insurance. 

     

    People should stay informed during a storm by keeping a battery-powered radio for weather and evacuation information and should know evacuation routes in their community. They also need to heed the warnings of state and local officials and evacuate quickly when told to do so. 

     

    Residents can evacuate their homes with their small, domestic pets to specially designated pet-friendly shelters. Pet shelters will be equipped with pet crates, but people should bring feeding dishes, food and water, immunization papers and other pet supplies. 

     

    “While North Carolina is better prepared today than it was 15 or 25 years ago, we are not immune from any storm’s impacts,” said N.C. Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “It’s critical that people prepare themselves and their families for emergencies. During those first few days after disaster strikes you may be on your own until responders can reach you and water, power and other essential services can be restored.”  

     

    Perry said that hurricane veterans may mistakenly focus on the storm category and dismiss the threat for lower-level storms. 

     

    “The most dangerous threat from hurricanes is flooding and storm surge,” said Perry. “The storm doesn’t even have to be classified as a tropical system to cause serious damage.”  

     

    More information on hurricanes and overall emergency preparedness can be found on the ReadyNC mobile app and online at www.ReadyNC.org.

Proclamation

May 4, 2015Public Safety

WHEREAS, Congress and the President of the United States have designated a national Peace Officers Memorial Day during Law Enforcement Officers Week; and

 

WHEREAS, the members of law enforcement agencies of North Carolina play an essential role in safeguarding the rights and freedom of the citizens of our state; and

 

WHEREAS, members of law enforcement recognize their duty to serve the people of North Carolina by safeguarding life and property, by protecting them against violence and disorder, and by protecting the innocent against deception and the weak against oppression or intimidation; and

 

            WHEREAS, during Law Enforcement Officers Week, and throughout the year, the State of North Carolina recognizes and appreciates the critical contributions and sacrifices made by members of law enforcement at all levels, and honors their courage and dedication;

 

            NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim May 4-8, 2015, as “LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS WEEK” and May 5, 2015, as “PEACE OFFICERS MEMORIAL DAY” in North Carolina, and commend its observance to all citizens.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this eleventh day of March in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

Proclamation

April 1, 2015Public Safety

WHEREAS, 9-1-1 is nationally recognized as the number to call in an emergency to receive immediate help from police, fire, emergency medical services, or other appropriate emergency response entities; and

 

WHEREAS, 9-1-1 was designated by Congress as the national emergency call number under the Wireless Communications and Public Safety Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-81); and

 

WHEREAS, the ENHANCE 911 Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-494) established enhanced

9-1-1 as a high national priority as part of our nation's homeland security and public safety; and

 

WHEREAS, people of all ages use 9-1-1, and it is critical to educate the public of all ages on the proper use of 9-1-1; and

 

WHEREAS, a growing segment of the population, including the deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, and individuals with speech disabilities increasingly communicate with nontraditional text, video and instant messaging communications services and anticipate that these services will be able to connect directly to 9-1-1; and

 

WHEREAS, thousands of 9-1-1 calls are made every year by children properly trained on the use of    9-1-1, resulting in lives saved which underscores the critical importance of training children early in life about 9-1-1; and

 

WHEREAS, there is widespread misuse of the 9-1-1 system, including prank and non-emergency calls, which can result in costly and inefficient use of 9-1-1 and emergency response resources; and

 

            WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina joins our nation in celebrating 9-1-1 Education Month; 

 

            NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim April 2015, as “911 EDUCATION MONTH” in North Carolina, and commend its observance to all citizens.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this twenty-seventh day of April in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

  • Signs bill to increase safety for our hard-working and valuable corrections officers

    April 11, 2015 • Legislation, • Public Safety

    Raleigh, N.C. - Governor McCrory took action on two pieces of legislation, signing Senate Bill 78, which increases protections for corrections officers and House Bill 41, which makes technical corrections to revenue laws. Both pieces of legislation were passed in a bi-partisan and nearly unanimous fashion.

    “I am pleased to sign Senate Bill 78 and give our hard-working and valuable corrections officers additional protections from the dangers they face day-in and day-out,” said Governor McCrory. “We must do all that we can to protect those serving in very difficult jobs and this legislation is another step in the right direction.”

    The governor will also let Senate Bill 14 become law on Sunday, April, 12 without his signature. Governor McCrory is in favor of most of Senate Bill 14, but Section 8 provides funding for staff positions for the Coal Ash Commission, despite the three judge panel declaring the Commission to be an unconstitutional entity on March 16, 2015. The Governor will not endorse a bill that provides funding for a Commission that is legally barred from taking any official action.

  • March 11, 2015 • Ethics and Accountability, • Public Safety

    Note: Leslie Davenport has made it her life's mission to educate her community about child abuse; the warning signs and prevention. She wants to make sure state laws are toughened across the country for convicted child abusers. They've already had an impact on North Carolina. Kilah was next to Governor Pat McCrory as he signed Kilah's Law. It strengthened North Carolina penalty for felony child abuse to twenty-five years to life in prison if convicted.

     

    This is my reality: Grandmother speaks out nearly year after toddler's death

    WBTV

    Maureen O'Boyle

    March 10, 2015

    http://www.wbtv.com/story/28355233/this-is-my-reality-grandmother-speaks-out-nearly-year-after-toddlers-death

     

    The grandmother of a Union County toddler who was severely beaten by her stepfather, leaving her with brain injuries, is speaking out nearly a year after the child's death.

     

    ...

     

    It has been nearly a year since Kilah died. Her death on March 13 was ruled a "homicide" by the North Carolina Medical Examiner.

     

    Holding an urn with Kilah's ashes, Leslie Davenport said, “This is my reality now this is my Kilah now. This is what I get to hold and to kiss and to sing to.” Kilah lived for twenty two months after her abuse. They couldn't fathom life without her, “We never imagined that she would pass away we thought had the rest of her life to try and heal her.”

     

    ...

     

    In 2012, (Joshua) Houser threw the three-year-old girl into a wall, leaving her with severe brain damage.

     

    Houser was convicted in February 2014 of felonious assault and is slated to serve at least eight to ten years behind bars. Kilah died two weeks later. “It was a big shock to us. Like most people you don't think this can ever happen to you. Child abuse crosses over every religion, ethnicity, every socioeconomic background,” Davenport says.

     

    "Kilah's in Heaven. This is just what's left of her remains on this earth," Leslie Davenport said Tuesday while holding a tiny urn. "But I feel like, if I put this in front of you, this is impactful. If she's sitting on the table as we're eating lunch, this is impactful."

     

    ...

     

    Leslie Davenport has made it her life's mission to educate her community about child abuse; the warning signs and prevention.

     

    She wants to make sure state laws are toughened across the country for convicted child abusers. They've already had an impact on North Carolina. Kilah was next to Governor Pat McCrory as he signed Kilah's Law. It strengthened North Carolina penalty for felony child abuse to twenty-five years to life in prison if convicted.

     

    Since Kilah's death last March, Leslie has spent every day spreading the word about Kilah's story. She hopes her family's work will save lives, “What our family has to do is focus on moving forward and putting this behind us and making changes so we can help other children and other families so this doesn't happen again.”

     

    There will be a fundraiser for the non-profit Kilah Davenport Foundation April 26. 

     

    ...

     

    Read the entire story here.

     

  • March 5, 2015 • Education, • Ethics and Accountability, • Healthcare, • Jobs and the Economy, • Legislation, • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. -  Governor Pat McCrory’s 2015-2017 biennium budget continues his focus on job creation, education and infrastructure. It also increases help and protection for those that cannot help themselves while maintaining fiscal discipline and increasing government efficiency.  

     

    There are no tax increases in the governor’s budget. 

     

    “This budget builds on our hard-earned successes and lays the foundation for a bright future for all North Carolina families,” Governor McCrory said. “This budget recommits us to the basic values that make our state great. When we unleash our potential in education, transportation, energy and technology, and commit to greater government efficiency and affordability, North Carolina will be second to none.”

      

    Job Creation

    Separate from the budget, the governor is supporting legislative measures that will allocate $45 million for NC Competes and $20 million for the Site Infrastructure Development Fund, a fund designed to attract major manufacturing projects, such as an auto production plant.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget restores and reforms the Historic Preservation Tax Credit to continue to revitalize main streets across North Carolina while ensuring that the credits are used wisely and where they can have the most impact.

     

    The Innovation to Jobs initiative was created to convert more university research dollars into products and services that are patented and introduced into the marketplace. To support this initiative, the governor’s budget invests $15 million in each year of the biennium in the Venture Multiplier Fund. This capital will be invested alongside private sector dollars in early stage commercial ventures. It also provides $2.5 million in recurring money for the Rallying Investors and Skilled Entrepreneurs, a program that will develop and leverage existing entrepreneurial management talent and recruit world-class investors and skilled entrepreneurs to the state.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget creates the University Innovation Commercialization Investment program, funded at $7.5 million during the next two budget years and recommends $5 million for the One North Carolina Small Business Program to provide early-stage funding for small, high-growth and high-tech businesses across the state. 

     

    It also appropriates $10 million in each year of the biennium to encourage the production of long-term, sustainable film projects and to further develop the film-making industry within the state.

     

    Education 

    North Carolina taxpayers have historically made a tremendous financial commitment to education, and this budget continues that legacy. More than $12 billion of General Fund monies will be spent on K-12 education in each year of the biennium. It allocates $235 million more in K-12 funding than the 2014-2015 budget—a 2.8 percent increase in spending.

     

    As promised, $111.4 million in each year of the biennium will be spent for teacher salaries to increase teacher base pay to $35,000 a year. This allocation also funds increases for teachers eligible to move to the next tier on the salary schedule. 

     

    To support enrollment growth, this budget provides for the hiring of more than 1,400 new teachers over the biennium as well as provides $128 million to maintain teaching assistant positions over the same time period. 

     

    The budget also rewards high-performing teachers by appropriating $15 million over the biennium to implement teacher pay for performance plans. 

     

    More than $70 million over the biennium will be spent to buy textbooks, instructional supplies and equipment. 

     

    Additionally, North Carolina’s Pre-K program will expand to accommodate 26,800 at-risk four-year-olds.

      

    The governor accelerates the talent pipeline by funding community college classes year-round, including in the summer, just like North Carolina businesses. The budget also invests $5 million for community colleges to purchase current, up-to-date equipment and technology used to prepare students for STEM careers.

     

    Critical Infrastructure 

    The budget commits nearly $4.8 billion to lay the foundation for Governor McCrory’s 25-year transportation vision, which focuses on connecting small towns and economic centers to simplify citizens’ commutes for work, school and recreation. This includes: an increase of $135 million for critical infrastructure investments; $51 million for road preservation and improvements; $36 million for capital repairs and renovations under the Capital Improvements plan and $10 million to ease congestion in rural and small urban areas.

     

    As the governor noted in his State of the State address, he will request a transportation bond of $1.2 to $1.4 billion for quicker construction of projects in the 25-year vision plan. 

     

    He will also request a $1.2 to $1.4 billion general obligation bond to revitalize blighted state buildings that can be saved and build new, workable and efficient facilities for the National Guard, community colleges and other agencies that will help create economic development opportunities for their communities.

     

    Help and Protect Those in Need

    To support the well-being of our most vulnerable citizens, Governor McCrory’s budget commits more than $10.8 billion to the Department of Health and Human Services over the biennium, or more than 24 percent of the General Fund annually. 

     

    Included in this allocation is an estimated need for $287 million in additional Medicaid funding in the first year of the biennium and $460.6 million in year two, taking into consideration forecasted changes in enrollment, anticipated costs per recipient, and utilization of services, as well as federal matching funds. Additionally, it supports the Healthy NC reform plan which puts patients first and controls costs for the taxpayers, while incentivizing health care providers to coordinate care. 

     

    This budget also prudently allocates $175 million over the biennium to the Medicaid Risk Reserve to provide a buffer against financial uncertainty in one of our biggest cost drivers.

     

    The budget provides nearly $82 million over the biennium in new funding for mental health and substance abuse services and increases funding for foster care, adoption support and the collection of child support payments.

     

    The budget also provides funds to modernize and replace equipment for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

     

    It also continues the state’s substantial commitment to the North Carolina Families Accessing Services through Technology (NC FAST) and NCTracks information technology platforms, which are replacing legacy information technology systems to efficiently serve our citizens and pay health care providers. 

     

    This budget fully funds the HOME match program with more than $1.5 million in each fiscal year. These dollars leverage federal matching funds of $20 million and enable the state to collaborate with local governments and nonprofits to serve 340 additional households, create over 400 jobs and generate an additional $1.7 million in state and local revenue.  Additionally, $1 million each year is committed to the Housing Trust Fund to help alleviate the shortage of safe, affordable housing for low- and moderate-income citizens.

     

    The governor’s budget also recognizes the dedication of law enforcement officers who protect us daily and corrections officers who confront the most violent people in our state every day.

     

    Governor McCrory’s budget includes $21 million in funding to help compensate and retain our corrections officers and their supervisors and funds the full five percent step increase for eligible State Troopers in each year of the biennium.

     

    There is additional funding to improve crime lab operations and reduce criminal case backlogs as well as funding for the Highway Patrol, State Bureau of Investigation, and Alcohol Law Enforcement to replace aging law enforcement vehicles to improve safety and reduce maintenance costs. 

     

    Find Efficiencies and Streamline Operations 

    The North Carolina Government Efficiency and Reform (NCGEAR) initiative will save more than $14 million in year one and more than $57 million in year two of the biennium. NCGEAR savings over 10 years are conservatively estimated at more than $615 million in today’s dollars.

     

    To continue customer service improvements at the Division of Motor Vehicles, $30 million is budgeted for technology and equipment modernization. 

     

    The budget carries out government operations efficiencies called for by the Governor in his State of the State address. Future workers’ compensation costs will be reduced through consolidated reporting and an overall improvement in case management to protect against fraud and abuse. 

     

    Attractions such as the North Carolina Zoo, state aquariums, museums and state parks will be transferred from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to the Department of Cultural Resources, which manages attractions as part of its mission. Advocacy groups will be moved from the Department of Administration to the Governor’s Office.

     

    To strengthen the Veteran Affairs and the Office of the Military Advisor, the budget proposes the creation of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

     

    This budget streamlines state information technology operations, making them more accountable and coordinated by creating a Department of Information Technology. 

     

    “The members of my administration and I are honored to submit this budget to the General Assembly on behalf of the people of this great state,” Governor McCrory said. 

     

    Click here for a copy of the Governor's Recommended Budget. Click here for a copy of the Budget PowerPoint.

  • Statewide Tornado Drill is March 4th

    February 27, 2015 • Public Safety

    Raleigh, N.C. - Governor Pat McCrory has declared March 1-7 Severe Weather Preparedness Week in North Carolina, cautioning North Carolinians to practice how to be safe when thunderstorms and tornadoes threaten. While damaging storms and tornadoes can occur any time of the year, March through May is peak tornado season for the state. 

     

     “Severe thunderstorms can strike quickly and spawn dangerous winds and tornadoes,” Governor McCrory said. “Despite the snow, sleet and freezing rain over the past few weeks, we are now entering the peak severe storm season, and we need to prepare and practice what to do when severe weather occurs. It’s critical to have emergency plans in place, put together an emergency supply kit and listen for weather alerts.” 

     

    Schools and government buildings statewide will hold tornado drills Wednesday, March 4, at 9:30 a.m. to practice their emergency plans. Test messages will be broadcast on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather radios and the Emergency Alert System. All North Carolinians are encouraged to participate in the drill.

     

    In 2014, the National Weather Service (NWS) issued 81 tornado warnings for North Carolina and recorded 36 tornadoes that killed one and injured 34 people. Combined, the tornadoes caused more than $22 million in damages. In addition, the NWS issued more than 632 severe thunderstorm warnings, and recorded more than 686 incidents of severe thunderstorms with damaging winds and/or large hail. The severe storms killed three people, injured seven others and caused $3.5 million in damages. 

     

    While spring and late fall are typically peak tornado season, severe thunderstorms and tornadoes can happen at any time of the year.

     

    Tornadoes usually form during heavy thunderstorms when warm, moist air collides with cold air.  These storms can also produce large hail and strong winds. Damaging winds are equally as dangerous.

     

    Last April, nine tornadoes touched down in one day in Beaufort, Bertie, Chowan, Currituck, Greene, Halifax, Pasquotank, Perquimans and Pitt counties, killing an 11-month old child and injuring 28 others. More than 300 homes were damaged or destroyed. 

     

    Emergency Management officials recommend having a weather radio that broadcasts NWS alerts when severe weather threatens. Many North Carolina tornado fatalities have occurred at night when people are asleep and less likely to receive a warning without a weather radio.

     

    Emergency officials recommend people use the following safety tips:

    • Know the terms: WATCH means a tornado is possible. WARNING means a tornado has been spotted; take shelter immediately.
    • Know where the nearest safe room is, such as a basement or interior room and away from windows, and go there immediately if you hear or see a tornado.
    • If driving, you should leave your vehicle immediately to seek safety in an adequate structure. Do not try to outrun a tornado in your vehicle, and do not stop under an overpass or a bridge.
    • If you are outdoors, and there is no shelter available, take cover in a low-lying flat area. Watch out for flying debris.
    • Following a storm, wear sturdy shoes, long sleeves and gloves when walking on or near debris, and be aware of exposed nails and broken glass.
    • Be aware of damaged power or gas lines and electrical systems that may cause fires, electrocution or explosions.

    More information on tornadoes and overall emergency preparedness can be found in the ReadyNC mobile app and online at www.ReadyNC.org. View and download the full proclamation here.

Proclamation

March 1, 2015Public Safety

WHEREAS, North Carolina is traditionally an active tornado and severe thunderstorms state and last year had 36 tornadoes touch down, with statewide damages exceeding $22 million; and

 

WHEREAS, in 2014, eastern North Carolina experienced several devastating tornadoes in the spring; and

 

WHEREAS, the National Weather Service in North Carolina last year issued 632 severe thunderstorm warnings and recorded 686 incidents of severe thunderstorms with damaging winds and/or large hail; and

 

WHEREAS, people are less likely to be injured when they know what to do when a tornado warning is issued and severe weather conditions threaten; and

 

WHEREAS, the average lead warning time for severe weather in 2014 was 17 minutes and the average lead warning time for tornadoes was 10 minutes; and

 

WHEREAS, lightning strikes are a significant threat in North Carolina, especially for people involved in outdoor recreational and sporting events; and

 

WHEREAS, citizens should listen to local radio, television, a weather channel or a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration radio for information on severe weather; and

 

WHEREAS, families should have an emergency safety plan for home, school and work, including knowing where the safest locations are on their regularly-traveled routes; and

 

WHEREAS, individuals should have a disaster supply kit on hand that contains a first-aid kit, a battery-powered radio, flashlight with extra batteries, canned and other non-perishable food, a hand-operated can opener, bottled water, sturdy shoes and work gloves; and

 

WHEREAS, ReadyNC.org and its mobile application are available to help residents with their emergency preparedness plans and provide current weather and traffic conditions for all parts of North Carolina; and

 

WHEREAS, the N.C. Department of Public Safety, N.C. Emergency Management, the National Weather Service and the N.C. Department of Public Instruction have collaborated to inform and educate North Carolinians about how to stay safe in severe weather; and 

 

WHEREAS, Wednesday, March 4, is the designated day for tornado drills to be held statewide in schools, government buildings and private companies;

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the week of March 1–7, 2015, as “SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK” in North Carolina, and call upon our citizens and interested groups to observe the week with appropriate activities that promote awareness of severe weather and how to stay safe.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this twenty-fourth day of February in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

  • Impacts not as severe as predicted, black ice still a threat

    February 26, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, NC – Governor Pat McCrory briefed citizens from the State Emergency Operations Center Thursday on the response to last night’s snowfall across the state.

    “It’s not often that the entire state of North Carolina sees significant snowfall like we’ve seen this week,” Governor McCrory said. “While it is beautiful, it also can be dangerous causing downed trees, power outages and treacherous driving conditions. Throughout the morning, we’ve seen driving conditions improve and we expect that to continue through the afternoon. We still have a lot of work to do in the next 24 hours.”

    The governor warned motorists to be cautious when driving, and urged everyone to be at their final destination by evening before temperatures start falling and the slush turns to black ice.

    The overnight winter storm brought an additional 4 to 6 inches of snow to the mountains, between 3 and 7 inches of snow through much of the Triad, Triangle and central part of the state and 2 to 3 inches throughout greater Charlotte and eastern North Carolina. The southeastern portions received mostly rain.

    On Wednesday, the governor activated the State Emergency Operations Center, declared a state of emergency, and waived certain vehicle weight and service hour requirements to expedite storm response.

    Power outages climbed steadily overnight, peaking near 230,000 outages around
    9 a.m., as the snow transitioned to sleet and rain adding extra weight to trees and power lines. By noon, less than 180,000 were still without power. Most of the outages are the Triangle area.

    Two people died Tuesday in separate weather-related vehicle crashes; no other weather-related fatalities have been reported since then.

    While checking on stranded motorists in Cherokee County, Trooper R.Y. Ellison came upon a frantic young mother in a vehicle with her infant child. The infant was having trouble breathing and the mother had just called 911. Trooper Ellison helped the mother assist the child and summoned nearby Trooper H.S Robertson, who is an EMT-Paramedic. The two troopers rendered aid for what appeared to be a temporarily blocked airway until a Cherokee EMS unit arrived.

    Emergency Management officials are coordinating with law enforcement officers from the Highway Patrol, ALE, Wildlife, and Division of Motor Vehicles License and Theft, along with National Guard.

    "Black ice will continue to be a problem in the coming days,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “Our State Emergency Response Team partners, which includes county and state level emergency management, law enforcement teams, National Guard troops and DOT are all collaborating to respond to constantly changing needs. The best way to remain safe is to stay off the roads that are covered in snow and ice and plan to stay off roads that may be susceptible to refreezing as the temperatures drop after dark.”

    NCDOT crews continue to work on plowing and treating roads across the state.

    As the latest round of winter weather moved in, NCDOT crews again worked through the night to plow and treat snow and ice covered roads. While the wet, slushy nature of the snow makes it easier to push off the roadways, crews in some harder hit areas are removing downed trees and debris from the roads in addition to clearing them of snow and ice. To help speed operations, the department is shifting some crews and equipment from less affected areas to those with greater impacts. The department will continue working throughout the day to clear affected roads, starting with primary routes and then moving on to smaller secondary roads, and crews will also be in place overnight to address any additional issues that arise.

    “I want to thank our hard working crews and other partners for their continued efforts through this latest storm,” NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata said. “While some of our state fared better than expected, road conditions remain treacherous in many areas, including the possibility of downed trees and debris, and we ask that motorists continue to use extreme caution and avoid travel if possible as we work to address all our roadways.”

    Real-time weather and road conditions, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or on line at www.readync.org website.

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up-to-date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded to call 911 for emergencies only and refrain from calling the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions.

  • State preparing for additional 4 to 8 inches of snow

    February 25, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, NC –  Governor Pat McCrory activated the State Emergency Response Team for the second time in two weeks to respond to a statewide winter storm. This morning, he declared a state of emergency and waived certain vehicle weight and service hour requirements to expedite storm response.

     

    “We are preparing for as much as eight inches of snow across the majority of the state,” Governor McCrory said. “The State Emergency Response Team that consists of multiple state and local agencies worked throughout the afternoon Tuesday and overnight and they have teams mobilized and ready for the next storm.” 

     

    Yesterday’s band of snow showers brought 1-3 inches of snow across much of the state. A more significant winter storm is predicted to move through the state later this evening and through Thursday bringing additional accumulations of 4 to 8 inches of snow across most of the state with forecasts being adjusted by the hour. The extreme southeastern portion of the state will likely see a wintry mix of snow, sleet and rain. 

     

    Between midnight and noon, State Highway Patrol troopers responded to approximately 700 calls for service; of those, 400 were collisions. Yesterday, troopers responded to nearly 3,000 calls for service including 2,300 vehicle crashes.  The Highway Patrol typically responds to approximately 1,000 calls in a 24-hour period.

     

    Yesterday, the governor implemented the Adverse Weather Policy for state employees enabling those workers who are not essential to storm response or daily operations to remain home. 

     

    Two people died yesterday in separate weather-related vehicle crashes when their car’s slid off the road and ran into a tree. 

     

    "Motorists are reminded to monitor the weather and road conditions,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “We’ve staged transportation crews and law enforcement teams to respond quickly to incidents especially around known trouble spots. But the best way to remain safe is to stay off the roads.”

     

    Perry said 800 law enforcement officers from the Highway Patrol, ALE, Wildlife, and Division of Motor Vehicles License and Theft, along with 86 National Guard soldiers are staged across the state to respond to stranded motorists. 

     

    After working overnight and this morning to clear and treat slick roads and trouble spots, NCDOT crews across the state began spreading salt brine on roadways to prepare for the next round of winter weather anticipated to arrive later today. Once snow and ice begins to stick to the roadways, crews will again work around the clock clearing and treating affected roads.

     

    “Over the past two weeks, our team has shown incredible fortitude and dedication as we have prepared for and responded to the multiple storms that have hit our state,” NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata said. “Those efforts continue as we get ready for even more winter weather, and I again thank motorists for their cooperation in staying off the roadways so our crews can work as safely and quickly as possible.”

     

    Real-time weather and road conditions, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or on line at www.readync.org website. 

     

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up-to-date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded to call 911 for emergencies only and refrain from calling the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions. 

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