Public Safety

  • Statewide Tornado Drill is March 4th

    February 27, 2015 • Public Safety

    Raleigh, N.C. - Governor Pat McCrory has declared March 1-7 Severe Weather Preparedness Week in North Carolina, cautioning North Carolinians to practice how to be safe when thunderstorms and tornadoes threaten. While damaging storms and tornadoes can occur any time of the year, March through May is peak tornado season for the state. 

     

     “Severe thunderstorms can strike quickly and spawn dangerous winds and tornadoes,” Governor McCrory said. “Despite the snow, sleet and freezing rain over the past few weeks, we are now entering the peak severe storm season, and we need to prepare and practice what to do when severe weather occurs. It’s critical to have emergency plans in place, put together an emergency supply kit and listen for weather alerts.” 

     

    Schools and government buildings statewide will hold tornado drills Wednesday, March 4, at 9:30 a.m. to practice their emergency plans. Test messages will be broadcast on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather radios and the Emergency Alert System. All North Carolinians are encouraged to participate in the drill.

     

    In 2014, the National Weather Service (NWS) issued 81 tornado warnings for North Carolina and recorded 36 tornadoes that killed one and injured 34 people. Combined, the tornadoes caused more than $22 million in damages. In addition, the NWS issued more than 632 severe thunderstorm warnings, and recorded more than 686 incidents of severe thunderstorms with damaging winds and/or large hail. The severe storms killed three people, injured seven others and caused $3.5 million in damages. 

     

    While spring and late fall are typically peak tornado season, severe thunderstorms and tornadoes can happen at any time of the year.

     

    Tornadoes usually form during heavy thunderstorms when warm, moist air collides with cold air.  These storms can also produce large hail and strong winds. Damaging winds are equally as dangerous.

     

    Last April, nine tornadoes touched down in one day in Beaufort, Bertie, Chowan, Currituck, Greene, Halifax, Pasquotank, Perquimans and Pitt counties, killing an 11-month old child and injuring 28 others. More than 300 homes were damaged or destroyed. 

     

    Emergency Management officials recommend having a weather radio that broadcasts NWS alerts when severe weather threatens. Many North Carolina tornado fatalities have occurred at night when people are asleep and less likely to receive a warning without a weather radio.

     

    Emergency officials recommend people use the following safety tips:

    • Know the terms: WATCH means a tornado is possible. WARNING means a tornado has been spotted; take shelter immediately.
    • Know where the nearest safe room is, such as a basement or interior room and away from windows, and go there immediately if you hear or see a tornado.
    • If driving, you should leave your vehicle immediately to seek safety in an adequate structure. Do not try to outrun a tornado in your vehicle, and do not stop under an overpass or a bridge.
    • If you are outdoors, and there is no shelter available, take cover in a low-lying flat area. Watch out for flying debris.
    • Following a storm, wear sturdy shoes, long sleeves and gloves when walking on or near debris, and be aware of exposed nails and broken glass.
    • Be aware of damaged power or gas lines and electrical systems that may cause fires, electrocution or explosions.

    More information on tornadoes and overall emergency preparedness can be found in the ReadyNC mobile app and online at www.ReadyNC.org. View and download the full proclamation here.

Proclamation

March 1, 2015Public Safety

WHEREAS, North Carolina is traditionally an active tornado and severe thunderstorms state and last year had 36 tornadoes touch down, with statewide damages exceeding $22 million; and

 

WHEREAS, in 2014, eastern North Carolina experienced several devastating tornadoes in the spring; and

 

WHEREAS, the National Weather Service in North Carolina last year issued 632 severe thunderstorm warnings and recorded 686 incidents of severe thunderstorms with damaging winds and/or large hail; and

 

WHEREAS, people are less likely to be injured when they know what to do when a tornado warning is issued and severe weather conditions threaten; and

 

WHEREAS, the average lead warning time for severe weather in 2014 was 17 minutes and the average lead warning time for tornadoes was 10 minutes; and

 

WHEREAS, lightning strikes are a significant threat in North Carolina, especially for people involved in outdoor recreational and sporting events; and

 

WHEREAS, citizens should listen to local radio, television, a weather channel or a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration radio for information on severe weather; and

 

WHEREAS, families should have an emergency safety plan for home, school and work, including knowing where the safest locations are on their regularly-traveled routes; and

 

WHEREAS, individuals should have a disaster supply kit on hand that contains a first-aid kit, a battery-powered radio, flashlight with extra batteries, canned and other non-perishable food, a hand-operated can opener, bottled water, sturdy shoes and work gloves; and

 

WHEREAS, ReadyNC.org and its mobile application are available to help residents with their emergency preparedness plans and provide current weather and traffic conditions for all parts of North Carolina; and

 

WHEREAS, the N.C. Department of Public Safety, N.C. Emergency Management, the National Weather Service and the N.C. Department of Public Instruction have collaborated to inform and educate North Carolinians about how to stay safe in severe weather; and 

 

WHEREAS, Wednesday, March 4, is the designated day for tornado drills to be held statewide in schools, government buildings and private companies;

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the week of March 1–7, 2015, as “SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS WEEK” in North Carolina, and call upon our citizens and interested groups to observe the week with appropriate activities that promote awareness of severe weather and how to stay safe.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in Raleigh this twenty-fourth day of February in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

 

PAT McCRORY

Governor

  • Impacts not as severe as predicted, black ice still a threat

    February 26, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, NC – Governor Pat McCrory briefed citizens from the State Emergency Operations Center Thursday on the response to last night’s snowfall across the state.

    “It’s not often that the entire state of North Carolina sees significant snowfall like we’ve seen this week,” Governor McCrory said. “While it is beautiful, it also can be dangerous causing downed trees, power outages and treacherous driving conditions. Throughout the morning, we’ve seen driving conditions improve and we expect that to continue through the afternoon. We still have a lot of work to do in the next 24 hours.”

    The governor warned motorists to be cautious when driving, and urged everyone to be at their final destination by evening before temperatures start falling and the slush turns to black ice.

    The overnight winter storm brought an additional 4 to 6 inches of snow to the mountains, between 3 and 7 inches of snow through much of the Triad, Triangle and central part of the state and 2 to 3 inches throughout greater Charlotte and eastern North Carolina. The southeastern portions received mostly rain.

    On Wednesday, the governor activated the State Emergency Operations Center, declared a state of emergency, and waived certain vehicle weight and service hour requirements to expedite storm response.

    Power outages climbed steadily overnight, peaking near 230,000 outages around
    9 a.m., as the snow transitioned to sleet and rain adding extra weight to trees and power lines. By noon, less than 180,000 were still without power. Most of the outages are the Triangle area.

    Two people died Tuesday in separate weather-related vehicle crashes; no other weather-related fatalities have been reported since then.

    While checking on stranded motorists in Cherokee County, Trooper R.Y. Ellison came upon a frantic young mother in a vehicle with her infant child. The infant was having trouble breathing and the mother had just called 911. Trooper Ellison helped the mother assist the child and summoned nearby Trooper H.S Robertson, who is an EMT-Paramedic. The two troopers rendered aid for what appeared to be a temporarily blocked airway until a Cherokee EMS unit arrived.

    Emergency Management officials are coordinating with law enforcement officers from the Highway Patrol, ALE, Wildlife, and Division of Motor Vehicles License and Theft, along with National Guard.

    "Black ice will continue to be a problem in the coming days,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “Our State Emergency Response Team partners, which includes county and state level emergency management, law enforcement teams, National Guard troops and DOT are all collaborating to respond to constantly changing needs. The best way to remain safe is to stay off the roads that are covered in snow and ice and plan to stay off roads that may be susceptible to refreezing as the temperatures drop after dark.”

    NCDOT crews continue to work on plowing and treating roads across the state.

    As the latest round of winter weather moved in, NCDOT crews again worked through the night to plow and treat snow and ice covered roads. While the wet, slushy nature of the snow makes it easier to push off the roadways, crews in some harder hit areas are removing downed trees and debris from the roads in addition to clearing them of snow and ice. To help speed operations, the department is shifting some crews and equipment from less affected areas to those with greater impacts. The department will continue working throughout the day to clear affected roads, starting with primary routes and then moving on to smaller secondary roads, and crews will also be in place overnight to address any additional issues that arise.

    “I want to thank our hard working crews and other partners for their continued efforts through this latest storm,” NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata said. “While some of our state fared better than expected, road conditions remain treacherous in many areas, including the possibility of downed trees and debris, and we ask that motorists continue to use extreme caution and avoid travel if possible as we work to address all our roadways.”

    Real-time weather and road conditions, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or on line at www.readync.org website.

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up-to-date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded to call 911 for emergencies only and refrain from calling the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions.

  • State preparing for additional 4 to 8 inches of snow

    February 25, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, NC –  Governor Pat McCrory activated the State Emergency Response Team for the second time in two weeks to respond to a statewide winter storm. This morning, he declared a state of emergency and waived certain vehicle weight and service hour requirements to expedite storm response.

     

    “We are preparing for as much as eight inches of snow across the majority of the state,” Governor McCrory said. “The State Emergency Response Team that consists of multiple state and local agencies worked throughout the afternoon Tuesday and overnight and they have teams mobilized and ready for the next storm.” 

     

    Yesterday’s band of snow showers brought 1-3 inches of snow across much of the state. A more significant winter storm is predicted to move through the state later this evening and through Thursday bringing additional accumulations of 4 to 8 inches of snow across most of the state with forecasts being adjusted by the hour. The extreme southeastern portion of the state will likely see a wintry mix of snow, sleet and rain. 

     

    Between midnight and noon, State Highway Patrol troopers responded to approximately 700 calls for service; of those, 400 were collisions. Yesterday, troopers responded to nearly 3,000 calls for service including 2,300 vehicle crashes.  The Highway Patrol typically responds to approximately 1,000 calls in a 24-hour period.

     

    Yesterday, the governor implemented the Adverse Weather Policy for state employees enabling those workers who are not essential to storm response or daily operations to remain home. 

     

    Two people died yesterday in separate weather-related vehicle crashes when their car’s slid off the road and ran into a tree. 

     

    "Motorists are reminded to monitor the weather and road conditions,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “We’ve staged transportation crews and law enforcement teams to respond quickly to incidents especially around known trouble spots. But the best way to remain safe is to stay off the roads.”

     

    Perry said 800 law enforcement officers from the Highway Patrol, ALE, Wildlife, and Division of Motor Vehicles License and Theft, along with 86 National Guard soldiers are staged across the state to respond to stranded motorists. 

     

    After working overnight and this morning to clear and treat slick roads and trouble spots, NCDOT crews across the state began spreading salt brine on roadways to prepare for the next round of winter weather anticipated to arrive later today. Once snow and ice begins to stick to the roadways, crews will again work around the clock clearing and treating affected roads.

     

    “Over the past two weeks, our team has shown incredible fortitude and dedication as we have prepared for and responded to the multiple storms that have hit our state,” NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata said. “Those efforts continue as we get ready for even more winter weather, and I again thank motorists for their cooperation in staying off the roadways so our crews can work as safely and quickly as possible.”

     

    Real-time weather and road conditions, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or on line at www.readync.org website. 

     

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up-to-date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded to call 911 for emergencies only and refrain from calling the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions. 

Executive Order

DECLARATION OF A STATE OF EMERGENCY BY THE GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA

Section 1.

I hereby declare that a state of emergency as defined in N.C.G.S. §§ 166A-19.3(6) and 166A-19.3(19) exists in the State of North Carolina due to a winter storm. The emergency area as defined in N.C.G.S. §§ 166A-19.3(7) and N.C.G.S. 166A-19.20(b) is the entire State of North Carolina.

Section 2. 

I order all state and local government entities and agencies to cooperate in the implementation of the provisions of this declaration and the provisions of the North Carolina Emergency Operations Plan.

Section 3. 

I delegate to Frank L. Perry, the Secretary of Public Safety, or his designee, all power and authority granted to me and required of me by Article 1A of Chapter 166A of the General Statutes for the purpose of implementing the State’s Emergency Operations Plan and deploying the State Emergency Response Team to take the appropriate actions as is necessary to promote and secure the safety and protection of the populace in North Carolina.

Section 4. 

Further, Secretary Perry, as chief coordinating officer for the State of North Carolina, shall exercise the powers prescribed in N.C.G.S. § 143B-602.

 

Section 5. 

I further direct Secretary Perry or his designee, to seek assistance from agencies of the United States Government as may be needed to meet the emergency and seek reimbursement for costs incurred by the State of North Carolina in responding to this emergency.

Section 6.

I hereby order this declaration: (a) to be distributed to the news media and other organizations calculated to bring its contents to the attention of the general public; (b) unless the circumstances of the state of emergency prevent or impede, to be promptly filed with the Secretary of Public Safety, the Secretary of State, and the clerks of superior court in the counties to which it applies; and (c) to be distributed to others as necessary to assure proper implementation of this declaration.

Section 7.

This declaration does not prohibit or restrict lawfully possessed firearms or ammunition or impose any limitation on the consumption, transportation, sale or purchase of alcoholic beverages as provided in N.C.G.S. § 166A-19.30(c).

Section 8.

Pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 166A-19.23, this declaration triggers the prohibition against excessive pricing as provided in N.C.G.S. §§ 75-37 and 75-38 in the declared emergency area.

Section 9.

This declaration is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until rescinded.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto signed my name and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in the City of Raleigh, this twenty-fifth day of February in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eight.

 

 

                        Pat McCrory

                        Governor

 

ATTEST:

 

 

                    Elaine F. Marshall                      

                    Secretary of State 

  • Significant snow predicted to blanket most of state in next two days

    February 24, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. - Back-to-back winter storms will bring measurable snowfall to much of the state twice in three days, a rarity for North Carolina. By the weekend, two separate winter storm systems will have moved across the state. Today’s band of snow showers is expected to bring 1-2 inches of snow in the Triangle and Triad areas, 2-3 inches of snow in the Fayetteville and Sandhills areas, 3-6 inches of snow in the foothills and mountains, and up to 2 inches in parts of eastern North Carolina. Snow showers will taper off mid-afternoon, but will not melt until Wednesday afternoon when temperatures briefly rise above freezing. 

     

    A more significant winter storm will move through the state Wednesday evening and through Thursday bringing more snow. Accumulations from the second snow storm are forecast to bring an additional 3 to 6 inches of snow across most of the state. The extreme southeastern portion of the state will likely see a wintery mix of snow, sleet and rain. 

     

    “While today’s snowfall has caused hazardous driving conditions in several areas from the mountains to the coast, we’ve seen relatively few power outages, downed trees or other impacts typically associated with winter storms,”  said Governor Pat McCrory. 

     

    Governor McCrory said he will activate the State Emergency Operations Center Wednesday afternoon and is prepared to declare a state of emergency and waive certain vehicle weight and serve hour requirements once needed.  This morning, the governor implemented the Adverse Weather Policy for state employees enabling those workers who are not essential to storm response or daily operations to remain home. 

     

    Since 6 a.m., State Highway Patrol troopers have responded to 2,060 calls for service. Of those, 1,727 were collisions. Troopers typically respond to approximately 1,000 calls in a 24-hour period.

     

    One person was killed earlier today in a single-vehicle collision when the driver’s car slid off the road and ran into a tree. Preliminary indications are that the accident was due to slick road conditions. 

       

    "We urge motorists to stay off the roads adversely impacted by weather unless it is absolutely necessary to travel,” said Public Safety Secretary Frank L. Perry. “Our state troopers are ready to assist stranded motorists as needed, but the best way to remain safe is to stay off the roads.” 

     

    NCDOT crews across the state have been working throughout the day to clear roads and treat slick areas with sand and salt, as well as brine roads where possible in advance of winter precipitation.  The department will monitor conditions overnight and crews will be on standby to respond as needed. Full crews will be out in force again on Wednesday to continue addressing roadways and preparing for the next round of winter weather forecasted for this week.

     

    “The safety of both motorists and our team members continues to be our top priority as we work to stay ahead of this storm and its impact to travel throughout the state,” Transportation Secretary Tony Tata said. “Our crews have worked hard today to address quickly changing weather and road conditions, and we urge travelers to use caution and avoid driving if possible as we continue our response efforts and prepare for the arrival of additional snow and ice.”

     

    Real-time weather and road conditions and shelter openings, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or online at www.readync.org web site. 

     

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up to date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded to call 911 for emergencies only and refrain from calling the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions. 

Executive Order

 

 

February 18, 2015

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 68

NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF EXECUTIVE ORDERS

WHEREAS, Executive Order No. 66, issued on February 16, 2015, declared a state of emergency in the State of North Carolina due to a major winter storm; and

WHEREAS, Executive Order No. 67 issued on February 16, 2015, waived the maximum hours of service for drivers transporting supplies and equipment for utility restoration and essentials in commerce, and with the concurrence of the Council of State temporarily suspended size and weight restrictions on vehicles used for utility restoration and carrying essentials on the interstate and intrastate highways due to anticipated damage and impacts from the winter storm.  In addition, the order also directed the Department of Public Safety to suspend weighing those vehicles used to transport livestock and poultry and feed for livestock and poultry.

NOW, THEREFORE, by the power vested in me as Governor by the Constitution and laws of North Carolina, IT IS ORDERED:

Pursuant to N.C.G.S § 166A-19.20(c) the state of emergency that was declared by Executive Order 66 was terminated on February 17, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Executive Order 67 is hereby terminated at 11:59 p.m. on February 23, 2015.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto signed my name and affixed the Great Seal of the State of North Carolina at the Capitol in the City of Raleigh, this eighteenth day of February in the year of our Lord two thousand and fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eight.

 

                        Pat McCrory

                         Governor

 

ATTEST:

 

 

                    Elaine F. Marshall                      

                    Secretary of State 

 

  • February 17, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. -  Governor Pat McCrory has lifted the State of Emergency issued in advance of this week’s winter storm. 

     
    However, state agencies, such as the Highway Patrol, the National Guard, Emergency Management and the Department of Transportation officials will remain vigilant to provide for the public safety as frigid temperatures enter the state during the next few days.
     
    The governor again thanked North Carolinians for staying off the roads and cautioned them to be prepared for continuing cold weather and refreezing road conditions. 
     
    “We’ve had a good day with plentiful sunshine which has helped with our road situation, but we are not out of the woods yet,” said Governor McCrory. "With bitter cold temperatures returning, refreezing will be a problem this evening and throughout the night.” 
     
    State agencies have been working throughout the day to clear roads and ensure that motorists are safe.   State Highway Patrol troopers along with nearly 100 law enforcement officers from Alcohol Law Enforcement, N.C. Wildlife and NCDMV License and Theft patrolled highways and assisted stranded motorists. 
     
    NCDOT crews worked throughout the day spreading salt, plowing and treating trouble spots on North Carolina’s roadways.  Interstates and primary routes were the first focus.
     
    “We are working as diligently as we can to clear the remaining primary roads and will focus on two-lane roads and secondary roads throughout the day tomorrow,” said Transportation Secretary Tony Tata.
     
    However, slick conditions and black ice remain a concern, even on routes that have already been cleared.  
     
    With utility crews working throughout the day, power outage numbers have been dropping quickly after exceeding 62,000 outages late this morning.  As of 4 p.m. approximately 36,500 power outages were reported across the state.
     
    The governor also asked residents to stay away from frozen ponds, to check on their friends and neighbors and look after their pets, as well. He urged residents to use caution with indoor heating sources. 
     
    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up to date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded NOT to call 911 or the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions. 
     
    If you must travel, the North Carolina Highway Patrol recommends following these safety tips:  
    • Reduce your speed. Driving at the regular speed limit will reduce your ability to control the car if you begin to slide.  
    • Leave plenty of room between you and other vehicles.  Bridges and overpasses accumulate ice first. Approach them with extreme caution and do not apply your brakes while on the bridge. 
    • If you do begin to slide, take your foot off the gas and turn the steering wheel in the direction of the slide. Do not apply the brakes as that will cause further loss of control of the car.  

  • Snow and ice expected across state

    February 16, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. - Governor Pat McCrory has issued a State of Emergency declaration ahead of a winter storm that will enter North Carolina this afternoon and is expected to hit the state with snow, sleet and freezing rain. 

     

    Governor McCrory said North Carolina’s State Emergency Response Team is preparing for the approaching winter storm and recommended that residents do the same.  

     

    “We are working with all necessary departments and local emergency management crews to keep residents safe and informed regarding potentially hazardous weather conditions," said Governor McCrory. “We’re asking that each resident and family do the same by paying attention to the weather forecast and following instructions from local officials.”

     

    This morning, Governor McCrory signed two executive orders to expedite storm response. The State of Emergency declaration enables the governor to mobilize the necessary resources to respond to a storm and is the first step in seeking federal funds to help defray eligible storm-related costs. The executive order waives restrictions on weight and the hours of service for fuel, utility and other truck drivers that may be working to deliver supplies, restore services or clear storm debris. 

     

    Governor McCrory also activated the State Emergency Operations Center to coordinate storm response and directed the State Highway Patrol to coordinate with other law enforcement and emergency responders statewide to mark abandoned vehicles to ensure that no one is left stranded in the dangerous weather. Additionally, he reminded motorists of the state’s quick clearance policy, instructing state transportation crews to clear the road by pushing to the shoulder any vehicles that may impede traffic. 

     

    Weather forecasts call for snow to begin mid-afternoon across much of the state, starting in the western part of the state and moving east. Predicted snow accumulations vary from two to four inches in the Foothills, Triad and Virginia-border counties and one to two inches in the greater Charlotte and Triangle areas, as well as the northeastern counties. By 8 p.m. sleet and freezing rain will cover much of the state and will continue through until tomorrow morning. 

     

    With the low temperatures, the sleet and freezing rain will accumulate as ice making roads treacherous and coating trees and power lines. Accumulations of one-quarter inch or more on trees and power lines often leads to power outages. 

     

    The Highway Patrol is shifting resources to cover potential trouble spots. And troopers will be actively looking for abandoned vehicles and tagging cars to ensure motorist safety. Additionally, National Guard troops are on standby and prepared to respond as needed. 

     

    NCDOT has been working proactively in advance of winter weather, with nearly 1,300 workers and nearly 500 trucks distributing more than 1.3 million gallons of salt brine across the state’s roadways. Crews throughout North Carolina will be working throughout the afternoon and overnight proactively putting down salt and sand and clearing roads.

     

    “Our dedicated crews have already been out in full force to prepare for this storm,” said NCDOT Secretary Tony Tata. “We will be monitoring conditions and working around the clock to clear our roadways, and we urge everyone to stay off the roads unless absolutely necessary.”

     

    Real-time weather and road conditions and shelter openings, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or on line at www.readync.org web site.

     

    Travelers are urged to call 511 or go to www.ncdot.org for up to date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded NOT to call 911 or the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions.

  • February 16, 2015 • Public Safety, • Transportation and Infrastructure

    Raleigh, N.C. - The Office of Governor Pat McCrory released the following media advisory for today. Governor McCrory will be joined by Secretary of Transportation Tony Tata, Secretary of Public Safety Frank L. Perry, Emergency Management Director Mike Sprayberry, Highway Patrol Commander Colonel Bill Grey and National Guard Adjutant General Gregory Lusk.

     

    Wake County

    WHO:          Governor Pat McCrory 

     

    WHAT:         Winter Weather Press Conference

     

    WHEN:         Monday, February 16, 2015

                        12:00 p.m.

     

    WHERE:       Joint Force Headquarters Media Briefing Room

                       1636 Gold Star Drive

                       Raleigh NC, 27607

                            

    PRESS:        OPEN to credentialed press only.

                       *Livestream available at:

                        http://new.livestream.com/accounts/3494995/events/3816454

     

    NOTE:         Additional information for press conference provided below:

     

    11:45 am EST – 12:00 pm EST: test window

    12:00 pm EST – 12:30 pm EST: Briefing

     

    This is a HD 1080i digital transmission  
    Transmission standard:  DVB-S  QPSK  MPEG-2    

    AMC-16- located at 85.0 degrees West.

    Transponder: K24 slot A 18.

    KU band

    Downlink: 12171  Mhz   L band: 1421 Mhz

    Polarity:   horizontal
    Symbol rate:  14.028723 MSps
    FEC 3/4

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